Rhôd in Roath / Rhôd yn y Rhath 2016

RIR2016

Front Garden Installations at numbers 18,19, 20, 30, 39, 47,61,
70, 76, 91, Ninian Road, Cardiff. CF23 5EF.

Rebecca Glover, David Green, Lauren Heckler, penny d jones, Sean Puleston, RhysReeceRees, Allison Rudd-Mumford, Liz Waterhouse.

Sat 15th Oct – Sun 16th Oct 2016, All day with guided tour each day at 2pm (meet @ no 18)

Rhôd is an annual exhibition/event that takes place in rural Wales,UK. One of the main objectives is to site contemporary art in rural settings. The artists in the show have shown at Rhôd or taken part in Rhôd Artists Camp 2016 and welcome the opportunity to place their work in an urban environment at the invitation of Made in Roath.
https://rhod.org.uk

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THE ARTISTS

Rebecca Glover (Garden No.47)
rhod-in-roath

Rebecca Glover was born in 1984 London. She studied at Edinburgh College of Art (2009) and with Alt MFA in London (2013-15).

She is interested in the point of interaction between the human body and its environment and where narrative, myth, and reality merge to make sense of this relationship. Her recent work playfully explores the frameworks that shape this interaction and how can we find alternative ways of engaging with/constructing a relationship with the world around us.

She works with sound, installation, video, photography, sculpture and painting to explore these ideas, making use of the multi-sensory range of media to alter viewpoints or methods of encountering a particular subject.

For Rhôd in Roath she will present work that explores the relationship between the two sites the mill at Rhôd and Roath mill.

She is currently resident artist at The Florence Trust, London and has recently been invited as inaugural Artist in Residence for SHELF 2016 (Snowdonia, Wales). Recent presentations of her work include: Radiophrenia Radio Broadcast (CCA Glasgow 2016), Awaiting Breath (Chisenhale Art Place 2016), To Be Converted (52 Whitbread Road Brockley 2016),  Citizen, (Chisenhale Dance Space 2016), Audible Structures Radio Broadcast (Project Radio Leeds as part of British Art Show 2015).

David Green (Garden No.91)

Reflections on a landscape.
The unpredictable jumpy, limbs.
Strange breath
An easy target, vulnerable in the open
Scary sinister Wolds
Sharp blades of grass
Trespassing to the shops

Lauren Heckler (Garden No.19 & 70)

My art practice is context-reflective and is largely communicated through time based media and performance. Theatricality, human connectedness, romanticised ideals and the boundaries between fiction and reality are the themes that run throughout my work. I am fascinated by the boundaries between art and life and would like to explore creating moments of poise between the two.

I am also co-founder of artist-led organisation, Site-Sit. Echoing the model of the nomadic artist, Site Sit explores a fluid and mobile approach to engaging artists with place by producing opportunities for artists to temporarily ‘inhabit’ different locations, situations and sites. I am very interested in the dialogue surrounding art in the urban V’s art in the rural and how each setting may influence the creative process and its reception. Having explored aspects of this topic with Site Sit’s initial project, Village Halls, I am pleased to be able to further examine it through the invitation to create work for Rhôd in Roath.

penny d jones (Garden No.20 & 61)

Rhôd in Roath 2016 gives me an opportunity to continue my investigations into colour, conversation and connections. I am especially drawn to Welsh speaking women’s voices, ties in time, locality and space, and work through a variety of media to celebrate the fecundity they bring to the domestic and external landscape. Currently living in west Wales, with strong paternal roots in Cardiff, I have chosen to make this particular work in London where I grew up. With access to two gardens, both owned by women artists, my work aims to enrich personal and universal connections through planting, on this occasion, with sgript and paint.

Mae Rhôd yn y Rhath 2016 yn rhoi cyfle i fi barhau efo fy ymchwil mewn i liw, sgyrsiau a chysylltiadau. Mae diddordeb gennyf mewn lleisiau menywod Cymraeg, rhwymau mewn amser, lle a gofod ac rwy’n gweithio trwy gyfryngau amrywiol i ddathlu’r ffrwythlondeb maen nhw’n rhoi i’r tirlun cartrefol ac allanol. Dwi’n byw yng ngorllewin Cymru ar hyn o bryd, gyda gwreiddiau tadol yng Nghaerdydd, dwi wedi dewis creu’r gwaith yma yn Llundain ble ces i fy magu. Gyda mynediad i ddwy ardd sy’n berchen i artistiaid benywaidd, mae fy ngwaith yn anelu at gysylltiadau personol a chyffredinol trwy blannu, ar yr achlysur hwn, gyda sgript a phaent.

the odds and against the odds
yr ots ac yn erbyn yr ots

Heol Ninian 20 Ninian Road
yr ots
the odds
plentyndod
childhood
ymateb a goroesiad
response and survival
chwarae gemau
playing games
babi coeden sy’n frwytho
baby tree which fruits
cuddio
hiding
wedi trapio
trapped
dianc
escape

Heol Ninian 61 Ninian Road
yn erbyn yr ots
against the odds
adulthood
oedolaeth
goroesiad
survival
coeden afal aeddfed
the mature apple tree
rhyddid
freedom

@pennyart
http://pennydjones.cymru

Sean Puleston (Garden No.76)

Sean Puleston’s new installation, Same Diff, brings his understanding of connection to place into an urban environment. Using what seems like a flippant slang statement, displayed like advertising, Puleston adopts Cardiff’s colloquial name to play with concepts of longing and nostalgia often connected to hiraeth and the rural landscape.

Puleston makes reference to the idea that although Cardiff is constantly evolving into a new modern city, this idea of regeneration has always been a part of its identity and is celebrated by its residents.

@seanpuleston
www.seanpuleston.com

Rhys Reece Rees (Garden No.18

Ask the Road


140 ballot papers were returned.
7 were differently completed.
The returning officers are analysing the results. Voters were asked to chose one or more of the Fundamental Human Needs they felt a lack of in their lives, some feeling a need for all 9 others choosing just 1.
Results will be posted in due course ….
For more information about Manfred Max Neefs’ theories relating to Fundamental Human Needs visit www.vegetableagenda.co.uk
info@vegetableagenda.co.uk

Rhys Reece Rees are collaborative palavarists deeply concerned about quite a lot of things. Earnest in their tackling of big issues in little ways. Having worked together for some time they have recently galvanised around the ideas of the ecological economist Manfred Max Neef and his concept of fundamental human needs which provides an inspiring method for societal and economic change. They think he is quite important.

Allison Rudd-Mumford (Garden No.30)
image2

I am inspired by nature, shapes, colours and patterns, the symmetry of living things.  My work reflects the abstract side of nature, sometimes mixing the real with the imagined.  Bringing the small element to the foreground and reducing the large specimen to a small background pattern.  I work in a range of mediums, as the situation dictates, paint, textiles, willow, clay etc; whatever presents.

A member/Director of King Street Gallery Artist Co-operative from 2008-2016,  I have shown my work in solo and group exhibitions.  I was invited to be part of the first Coracle Wexford Art Exhibition and my work has been shown at the National Eisteddfod of Wales.  I am a member of a group of Welsh and English artists who have an annual exhibition in Rotherhithe, London.

My work for Rhod in Roath celebrates the wool industry in Wales and links to the Museum of Wool in Drefach Velindre.

Liz Waterhouse (Garden No.39)


Rhod in Roath 2016 has given me the perfect platform to revisit work made for the first Rhod exhibition in 2009 at Melin Glonc, Drefelin in West Wales. Having just uprooted from Cardiff to move to West Wales it felt appropriate to reinvestigate ideas around flight and reflection and the upside down.

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Thank you to Lucy and Matt, Dorcas Pennyfather Frazer, Sue Willams, Bee and Roland, Kirsty Foster, Peter Knight, and the Mellor family who kindly provided front gardens for the show. The event would have been impossible without their enthusiastic co-operation.